Creative Minds in Medicine

Karen Bowersox of Downs Designs shows the "Dip Down" jeans her company designed for people with Down Syndrome. Photo (c) Kathiann M. Kowalski.

Karen Bowersox of Downs Designs shows the “Dip Down” jeans her company designed for people with Down Syndrome. Photo (c) Kathiann M. Kowalski.

What do the arts and medicine have in common? More than you might think.

This week’s Creative Minds in Medicine conference in Cleveland brings together a wide range of experts from both the artistic and medical communities. Presented by the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture, the program spotlights some of the many ways art can contribute to better health outcomes and how health issues are influencing art.

Different forms of art therapy have been practiced for decades, but innovation continues. The Alzheimer’s Poetry Project is a prime example. Founder Gary Glazner led the packed conference room through a spirited session using call-and-response, stories, and on-the-spot composition. The session showed how the project uses poetry to improve the quality of life for patients with memory loss.

Deforia Lane’s presentation on the healing power of music showed how and why music therapy is helping people of all ages dealing with mental and physical disease and disabilities. Lane directs art and music therapy at University Hospitals Case Medical Center’s Seidman Cancer Center in Cleveland. Her rousing session had participants singing along, clapping, and even hand-dancing. (You had to be there.)

Research results support these and other forms of art therapy. But more is needed, stressed Sunil Iyengar of the National Endowment for the Arts. Toward that end, his office offers some grants and is partnering with other government agencies to increase funding opportunities for researchers.

But art doesn’t just help patients directly. It can help health professionals too—enabling them to serve patients better.

Toward that end, the Cleveland Museum of Art’s Vital Signs program for healthcare professionals brings medical residents and students into the museum for focused programs. Rather than spending just a few seconds in front of an artwork, groups focus on them for about 20 minutes. They discuss pieces of art together, and questions help them see and appreciate different perspectives.

Artists and designers are producing products and services that help the medical community too. A design and innovation panel showcased mobile apps, custom-designed skull plates, and even adaptive clothing.

The program continues today in Cleveland. And artists and designers in Ohio and elsewhere will continue to innovate and contribute to medicine and other fields that touch our lives everyday.

 

 

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