Can Religion Reduce Risks of Suicide?

Teen suicide is always a tragedy. Sadly, it’s the third leading cause of death in the United States for young people between the ages of 10 and 24, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And beyond the 4,600 young people who die from this preventable cause each year, another 157,000 in that age group wind up at emergency departments for self-inflicted injuries.

Torahs at Congregation Mickve Israel in Savannah. Photo (c) Kathiann M. Kowalski.

Torahs at Congregation Mickve Israel in Savannah. Photo (c) Kathiann M. Kowalski.

While these figures are just for the United States, teen suicide is a concern for countries around the world. Now a new study from Tel Aviv University provides some interesting insight.

Researchers Gal Shoval and Ben Amit found that observant Jewish teens displayed 45 percent less suicide risk behavior, including attempted suicide, than Jewish teens who did not actively practice their religion. The study appears in the journal European Psychiatry.

Previous studies of Christian teens had also found lower risks for suicidal behaviors among those who actively practiced their faith versus those who didn’t. However, Shoval and Amit believe the explanation for the lower risks are different for the two groups.

As Amit explained in the press release from Tel Aviv University:

Using statistical tools, we demonstrated that the protective effect of the practice of Judaism was not associated with a decreased risk of depression. Instead, it enhanced effective coping mechanisms. This stands in direct contrast to studies of religious Christian teenagers who reported feeling less depressed than their secular peers. According to our study, religious Jewish teens appear less likely than secular ones to be at risk of suicide even though they are still likely to be depressed.

Shoval suggests that practicing their religion might provide Jewish teens with a source of hope, even if they continue to suffer depression:

We know from working with suicide survivors that even when they were 99 percent sure they were going to kill themselves, they still sought hope. Jewish faith and community may be their most important source of hope.

This raises some questions and challenges for everyone, regardless of which faith they may follow or not follow. For starters, what can everyone who cares about teens do to spread hope, both at and outside of a church or other religious community?

Beyond that, how can we address continuing problems of depression for all teens, both as a society and in our individual lives? Even if a teen is not suicidal, living with depression is not a happy situation.

Access to mental health services and support for getting help are crucial. After all, someone’s life may depend on it.

 

 

 

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