Read, Plan, Prep, and Indulge

Large dinner salad with steamed clams, drizzled with citrus balsamic olive oil. Photo (c) Kathiann M. Kowalski.

Despite lots of local stores hawking Halloween candy, my husband and I are continuing our healthy eating habits from summer into fall. And no, I’m not viewing this as a diet. Rather, it’s an adventure in living the good life.

Fortunately, there are lots of awesome fresh fruits and vegetables still available at both groceries and local markets. Better still, today’s food stores carry a wide array of foods from around the world.

So, yes, I am reading labels–a lot. In particular, I’m checking out sodium, carb, sugar, and calorie info.

Especially for sodium, it’s clear that the best way to stay within recommended guidelines is to cook more meals from scratch at home. Doing that helps keep refined sugars and calories in check too.

On the other hand, life gets busy. To do things most efficiently, I try to plan ahead. I cooked twice as much salmon today at lunch so I could save some to top a salad tomorrow or Friday. A couple of chicken breasts roasted next to them at the same time, to make sandwiches or other meals through the weekend.

I don’t plan too much, though. When it comes to cooking styles, I might read recipes for ideas or basic info, such as how long meat or fish should generally cook or how to handle a whole bulb of fennel or a blob of celery root.

Beyond that, though, I mainly improvise. Among the nutritional gatekeeper cooking styles described by Cornell University’s Brian Wansink, I’d count myself among the 19 percent who are “innovative cooks.”

Wansink, who heads up the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University, surveyed hundreds of domestic cooks. All were ranked as “great cooks” by themselves and at least one other adult family member.

The resulting study, published in 2003, identified five different styles of cooks: giving cooks, healthy cooks, innovative cooks, methodical cooks, and competitive cooks.

Wansink’s point was that knowing about the different styles could lead to tailoring nutrition education. The information could also provide clues about who might be early adapters when it came to trying and promoting different types of food.

But the best part of this whole innovative healthy food lifestyle isn’t the planning and prep. It’s the eating!

And tonight for supper, I had a large low-sodium, low calorie, and thoroughly yummy salad topped with steamed clams and drizzled with a tablespoon of citrus balsamic olive oil. As Julia Child and Julie Powell would both say, “Bon appetit!”

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